Electrical Engineering

The electrical engineering (EE) program is by far Capitol Technology University's most comprehensive. The program is a blend of theory and practice directed at engineering design, rather than research. As you progress through the program, more theoretical methods of circuit modeling and computer-aided circuit simulation tools are taught, enabling you to design, build, test and analyze sophisticated circuits and systems. You can keep your engineering education broad-based or specialize in areas such as telecommunications, digital signal processing, integrated circuit design and control theory.

Just as important, you'll become a well-rounded professional. Humanities and social science courses encourage you to understand how your work relates to larger professional and ethical issues in engineering.

Program Chair: Dr. Nayef Abu-Ageel

Dr. Nayef Abu-Ageel is the Chair of the Electrical Engineering Department at Capitol Technology University. Dr. Abu-Ageel has over fifteen years of academic and industrial experience in research, teaching, and entrepreneurship. He holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Michigan State University. His MS and BS in Electrical Engineering are from Yarmouk University and Jordan University of Science & Technology respectively.

From 2013 to 2015, he led the process for developing learning outcomes assessment, curriculum development, and implementation of continuous improvement processes to meet the requirements of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) for two undergraduate engineering programs at Al Ain University of Science & Technology. He previously taught in the electrical and computer engineering department at Michigan State University, and from 2000 to 2001, he was a manager at a Massachusetts high tech startup company.

Most recently, Dr. Abu-Ageel served as an adjunct professor in the Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at George Mason University. He taught “Introduction to Engineering” to honor engineering students and “Introduction to Circuits and Electronics” to bioengineering students. The innovative teaching practices he introduced include integrating entrepreneurship into class material as well as involving engineering students with the local community through designing and delivering engineering mini-workshops to local K-12 students.

Dr. Abu-Ageel’s research focused on the development of optoelectronic devices for telecom and display applications. The impact of his research on projection displays has been demonstrated through: (i) the development of a solid-state light source technology for projection displays and its demonstration in the highly selective Innovation-Zone exhibit at Display Week in 2012, and (ii) the development of an ultra-compact laser-based pico-projector architecture and the presentation of research results in a “Late News” session at the Society for Information Display International Symposium in 2012.

Read an interview with Dr. Abu-Ageel.