Computer Science (BS)

Program Educational Objectives

The Pro­gram Ed­u­ca­tional Ob­jec­tives are broad state­ments that de­scribe what grad­u­ates are ex­pected to accomplish within three to five years of grad­u­a­tion. They are con­sis­tent with the mis­sion of Capitol Technology Uni­ver­sity.

The Pro­gram Ed­u­ca­tional Ob­jec­tives of each of our pro­gram were de­vel­oped in con­sul­ta­tion with the pro­gram con­stituen­cies: stu­dents, alumni, em­ploy­ers, fac­ulty and program’s Ad­vi­sory Board.  

Within three to five years of graduation, CS alumni will:

  • Be highly sought and will be recognized as having expertise in their field.
  • Demonstrate a lifelong commitment to expanding their professional expertise.
  • Be effective communicators, effective team members, or leaders.
  • Continue to demonstrate character and values by making ethical decisions throughout their professional careers.
  • Strive for the betterment of society by pursuing their vocation.

Student Outcomes

Upon graduation, graduates will:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the program’s student outcomes and to the discipline
  2. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  3. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
  4. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
  5. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
  6. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  7. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
  8. Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development
  9. An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.
  10. An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices.
  11. An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity.